immodicusdiligo
Aspice "The Thetikomatheia" (thetikos{positive} amatheia{ignorance})

I submit this work in dedication to Sir Thomas Browne and that Greek poet, and also grammarian, Lycophron whom wrote as a show-piece for the School of Alexandria.

"I abhor all common things"- Callimachus

"The text no larger then the limbs of fleas;
And every square of text an awful charm,
Writ in a language that has long gone by.....but the long sleepless nights of
my long life have made it easy to me."- Idylls of the King.
---------------------------------------
Immodicus Diligo Iter itineris

Forgotten art all things which lovely lie: save what canst, with ease, thus find
thou who art like Tyche in the statue by Eutychides of Sicyon whence oft supplied
that incanous genius of my quiet breath, wheresoe'er thine every image is kept,
that oft-times hath charm'd allicient casements, thereof so opening, unto the mind,
only so thou canst preventeth I from that penitence in needing to hitherward live
as Erebus so doth enjoyeth, who art the lone father by way of Aether and Day,
in pathless and intemperate hope which lies and in that portent of such lonely dayes (A)
a' far from Corydon and Thyrsis who wrote great eclogues by their homely glades.
O for I attended a youthful suit in those broken slaves who whence calling themselves
Artists or Scientists conceive thereof a scholar of the World's wayes- or e'en some
reverential Sui generis certified to honoreth, uponeth that altar of our Immortal Traits,
those judgments and candor wherewith God Almighty advocated his most tortured race:
that his natural image, in Man so thereof begotten, dost thereupon falter grace
the experient calculation unto which He entereth Beauty into Time and Place
that he canst removeth Man from those beatific movements of Life's natural state
for in the Soul's immurements of the Soul, which Philosophy we so dost calleth,
without the guide of love, there art a plenty of Men who so abide by this laughable faith.
Forlorn! The foil of Our afflicted conceit canst not observe what Thou hath brought
in Heaven that is life's enthetic happiness which mine sound thought oft hath caught
to so readily visit in those newly garnered investures that twas, thereupon my hours,
oft given to that Epinician World that I dost calleth Hope and that thou blessedth-
of hitherto wanting thee over the writing of: O for thee who in the race of Thalestris hast
been hereof introduced unto I whence charity was first let down from such ambition
that thou, in thine own perficient motion, thereof canst beset these solifidian Poems
that art so beauteous like Cleanthes and his universal prayer, which to Zeus was drawn,
and so as to enliven my good heart
but also so as to, however so gradually, inciteth I
towards the continence of those good parts,
which oft born to thou dost I hark for I, delighted nigh,
as Apollonius of Tyana, in this ascetic hermitage,
hence recognize that for the Truth to thou I mayst embark.
Thou heard Wisdom in her choreutic and ecbolic tones
and captivated thy Soul shalt forever call that music Home.
And every time I fall in love I take a particle of her Beauty
with me, ingrafted, as Euryalus and Nisus the ideal friends,
to my own Soul that I canst become a genus of that love
untaught- that I canst become an Angel of the above unsought.
Prey tell, that I, the collector of names, should ask
thou ordained captain of my faith- thou inservient
messenger, what canst thou be called truly save the Parthenian day
like Pausanias at Syene wherefore the sun dost no shadow cast?
That thine grace doth I testeth like Eris' incentives in her apple passed
or e'en in that cautious will of God whence it dost so passey exerted
so doth to cause to climb the inimitable purpose that the Fates do lay
and thereof inaugurated in the one latreutic body on the Earth
doth the anxious contest of finding and treating what love thou gave
so pervade the teaching of a philosopher hence to leave wonder averted
that thine true Wisdom and Grace canst be revealed unto mine Birth
of the Poems hence that I surrendereth unto thine beauty as thine deserves.
What Capo Ducato thou canst provide, which from the Sea dost elect to rise,
that hath been here welcomed, in the dust converted,
those Dead Men thereof that all, in the policy of thine to keep,
the shining vision of your empaestic want, dost findeth triumph to ever sleep
so that in Our death to the World thou wilst the World keep.
Every key applied to the sky was crowned— of Stellae erraticae,
Pleiades, Hyads, the stars 1 which within The Soul art
crudely sound, that, standing unto, thou might riseth to
Pity the world for whilst our dayes have seen:
The sun 2, when first by him the world was turned to die,
in it's inscient currency, and he hence treated us withal action sly
and of eyes that aspire to Heavens thee couldest only dream-
but that thou mayst write, or hope, or grope, or of sing-
thee should maketh art the only thing compensatory known
that entailsest thou knowest to pity the obtrusive spring
Within thine own lucent eyes, that would Feed'st thy Soul
and content of vinous contempt and those services of lies
when should cometh the hallmark of that recursive beame,
hark, that to stunt one's hopes of meeting wives it dreams.
That celebrity of Beings higher; 3 thou canst not tempt that
coming parhelic circle- 4 how in the still and shooting rayes,
of the Dietetical soul, loitering amidst the staid current of our sight
will thrive a deal of new earths, Orbes, and shooting rayes, of life:
which in manhood's strength will inundate to please thee -
Great sight 5, who had but thy inspiration given,
No matter through what danger sought I'll fathom hell
as Ćneas and that bough 6, e'en with it's veridical lentitude,
which now through all the general show of this Taste,
has brought your body up beneath your presuming face
which now around me layes like Enna or Umbilicus Sicilić 7:
or Proserpine's sacred grove that, as Cicero will point out,
was within a day's journey of the nearest point
on all of it's three coasts, like you, who's strange situation
leaves you yet commoner then most: and hence a landmark
amongst the penumbra of women like that queen Semiramis
who by doves was fed and oft thou bathe in thou vale
that is sororal and I in the variegated flesh of good hope.
Time, who art the expiscatory Lord of my Soul's thought,
how crude but curious thou doth grows't
and how truly brilliant it is when thee canst
unnerve the wide world and effused seasons
as thou whilst wander'st, to the back of me,
thou who causeth I to think myself some
luminary of the universe: for thou art the
caustic ether which surviveth Our cogent liqueur
that, in condign interest, whilst seem to
hang me in the fixtures of the most important
amongst the Napaeae which art whimsical.
Time, thou first created thing-
Time, preceding all, for it is in only you that
things art given precedence or newness-
you art the chief intoxicant, the strongest effect
is in your consumption of consumption itself.
The universe, being first inlaid with your drug,
leaves countless ages of insobriety for all things
under you are forced to take you and to you become addicted.
For you I, this glutton, be: to devour the tears
That fill’d the world's due, and by Time's disease,
Who's tender countenance, of him makest a legislator
of sorts, o' er which a government was made
which did roundeth nations out of thoughtful glades.
That is to linger in the thought of Poetical truth-
which curses Leo of Isauria 8 and the books of the Sun
of science 9, and aims to reveal the world's freshest ornament
and to eat the riper [8] should, whilst he bathe at sea,
thereby that only herald to the world's due-
and knowing withal modest kingship of thyself thy own,
to thine own vernation surrendereth thy sweet self too
Lest once more wandering from thee that I live- for it
is more than willingly that I livest for your gift: for more
than willingly I would neglect with my eyes, that wishing,
hath been fixed to staring upon an object to concise
that to be the object of my wish it would have done you so.
I, in my pelorian and syndetic state, out of well-tuned sounds,
by unions carried, do but sweetly chide thee, who confounds
In singleness the enatic stars- do I consider every thing that thou receiv'st
And, having climbed that true concord of your huge theater,
presenteth nought but an itinerant service in your effulgent ignes fatui.
For what, if I die, would'st thou love me not even that what
hath I yet obtain, I could give: which should be termed desire;
and almost like the only sweets of our Earthly revenue.
To thy safe bosom I live, for more of the wandering
of my everlasting stress. I could once obtain, but I would give:
Which should sufficiently be full complete and nothing
wanting but the art of love- a sap checked with Eclipses of
my memory as it came to pass collected in your Septentrion.
After Death- that is the death of love- left nothing is,
and from the laic divide, shouldest the wise Inquireth
or come to figuring how to devise? When a spoil of books
shall besiege thy self alone, thou of her prime: thou mightest
get a sum of my old excuse proving your incidental expenses yet,
Attending on my own new-appearing sight and still
Serving with thy self dost thou spend upon thy time thy own
which is aureous to only you. She, I suppose, was such
another who found no substitute for emphasis; vacant of
celations, her Pacific bust gives promise of the skin's excellence.
But philosophy is known to draweth up the weak,
in her engraft, and in her art they lulled to sleep;
like those Bees who frometh Sephalica dost migrateth deep.
Search, into the social thought of, while thou wilst
of Reason, for that line which nature twists be known.
That thou art, to all the devils, inclined to learning in
this sum of nature's motions that I canst never die
and, reading them like the celestial shield of Nonnos 10,
or the veil that Josephus talked on 11 which with the
constellations of Heaven was decorated or even
that ovoid stone bearing an inscription for Sargon I
in dedication to the temple of Sippara 12, it would
come to passey that reflections unto you were sought
Till death abrupts them, and that instructive light,
Whose weary beams may on thy works to read,
That learning them in thee I shall havest my life.
I may on thy Maker's will; for unto reason go,
To ransom truth, e'en to read, that I might award
reason My great, sacred, oath: revealing Devils in
the sacred plan and professing in the the synectic smile,
thereby unto the Philosopher's rights that I would defile,
or that I shall drive, backed with the spoils of nature,
to stoop again below those Penates of the less divine 13,
Who's cernuous roses, for unto reason flow, to ransom
truth, e'en to replete the proof, of Love's sometimes being
but the grace which fascinates that to each other tie.
God, 'Then, by your favour, anything that's writ
Against this with unwonted thought as when homeward
I despise: this charity supernatural, with it's own
erotic tribe- whose talents lie in pride and vanities,
and when come to be enjoyed tear apart our World
whilst the wretched man or a churchman who thinks,
like sort, his actions in their fellow slaves to soar aloft,
Will call the hand of Arts to tame them in entertainment?
From my human heart, worthy of forgiveness,
With one impulse propels that bard
Who's famous with such authority,
Who's famous with eternity alone:
Not unlike Lel and Po-Lel 14 who, chasing each other,
do cause to being precipitated the aestival spirit.
Masters, I propose to be the mind, when sixty years
completed be, can from his shell, painting with a scholar
vain who is it for recompense, to behold a world that
already slumberest deep that I may succeedeth
to make my own circle of Vico 15 ; all for one hero
who but knew his own receipt and made a
lambent sunbeam in succinct lies he designed to tell
which would seek to illicit in his animal's life profiting
and causeth the world no longer to it's rest in peace.
I hate the bee whose sting is called enjoyment: [ie. orgasm]
Ah, happy, happy love! Thou art the most timid Silenus.
For ever bid the infinite movement of youth before my sight
where wasteful Time debateth there with only dicacity
and will, in benignant form, doth tease us out of each other's
woes so that love's familiar and intrinsical parts and all their
style I'll read and in His greatest power hide, stealing unseen
that I may outlive my love engrafted hence to this separation
with one I hath supposeth died; and there reigns Love,
and a ransom of all triumphant splendour unto thee-
so let him here who doth hence remain to see me
and calleth himself in the name of Reason's pride-
That Earth, Sea, and Air- supplied- should keepeth me
in this dapatical monument of the morning's eye alive!
EVEN as the shadow makes me first I burn, with
such true-love, in such a common one, In shape,
in sight: It is in you that I have come from this thrall,
hitherto in some remote corner of your tissues, all.
And for my sake, whilst thou lay on me alone,
Take all my sake to model races newer.
Thou shalt remaineth, in the midst of conticent nobility,
Eclectic and oscinian musician, unwearied in your exemplary labor,
as Numa Pompilius 16 who, in the name of Vesta,
constituted that temple thereof where the sacred fire burns
for I, myself, hath consigned to createth one of yours-
thereby that thou shalt commandeth, as Philopoemen's urn 17,
The threshold of Earth's beauty as the convict of your form:
A little town you are, shaped thereby heroic deities,
and of a Botany so splendidly wrought. But reason dost tease
us out of youth before this sight; and thou depriveth me of
partaking samples in a garden who's plants drawest breath
up in your only human passion which canst grant them life.
Our Earth mothered Man, and thee did mother Her;
Thou who couldest write the stars in numbers fresh for I.
Philosophy! My ineptitude of thinking shall not persuade me
that I, the blind, do clearly see of you who art but a thought
which in this breast of mine doth cover me: or at least my Soul,
that which in thee time's furrows, is so old.
In you man faced the problems of his life and climb, said then his rage,
His swift pursuer from Hope to immund Idols:
and hence name them Reason, Truth, and Scope
for Eternal Justice was layed vanquisht after these appear'd.
But philosophy herself, oer' which these pretensions fall,
is far more kind and the kindest still, of man's expenses all,
who is not the distant seraph rowling in Heaven that sat on
thrones which, oft reassembling our convincible Powers,
Consulted how the fervent Clime smote on the Nations round
For those that, being males, were caused to listen and to bound
and to sacrifice their eminence to this forlorn Patron of the proud;
who's method causes one to think himself, like a young Artist,
a member of some sacred Kind, though with more efficacious
and more intently present mind, for Philosophy, that masculine
practice, being named but only the pursuit of knowledge is
thereby apt to becoming a vehicle for poetic thought.
DESTINY WHO ART THOU, HUMAN LOVE'S OWN BODY,
THAT, INSPIRING ALL CONJUGATION, IS THE FINAL MUSE
That you are fair or wise and forever good;
That if one thing is vain
Or strong, or generous,
You must add those tyrants to your sword.
The sap of Art, procured in gentle work, dost stain
The lovely gaze where to me thou repliest,
Or rememberd where every eye was born
To make the fashions of perpetual sight my license:
Beauty is a nativity in You, O like Epimenides 19,
And to all your untaught strain- for Beauty is Success
and in success thou dost campaign- for ever will the
lovers new, by you, pronounce their independent Muse.
I would livest yet an Ecbatana 1 hence knowing where,
unto the Pinax of Cebe, 2 wouldest that epornitic issue of
Thales 3 collect to supporteth mine soul to traveling and
treasure like from the way my pen couldest move to thee
so in that diuturnal natation couldest I yet ever leave
that can be lived by I what nescient and long lasting worlds!
AND into which the Enneads of Plotinus, 4 as it were
that they shouldest about one groweth, were
like pale angels which in imitativeness did explain you
who art a mother to me like The Suidas 5 or the
Theatrum of Ortelius 6 or even those lands of
Sidon, 7 into which Jesus and Herod 8 passeyd,
or the Origines of Cato 9 which of the cities of Italy
would tell or even shouldest you be
like that Tower of Persia, 10 mentioned in the works of
Procopius of Caesarea, wherein one was buried live.
What of God's design which is deictic 11 that, in supinity,
should have it that those measures of your youth
should causeth me, in mine, a learner of Palaemon? 12
The erroneousness of the part that is my greatest calls; that
in God's edict I had only, by the face incanous, 13
came so as to chance unto contention that surviveth without name.
I saith; that if God, of want, should uniteth the
Men of Earth unto his Heaven then why art those men so
disposed towards these feelings which, unaccompanied,
do so readily evoke a feeling of divine consummation?
For when merely the thought of you, which is like the
Statua of Janus, 14 causes to issue Salmacis 15
and, like that redolence of Nilica, 16 which doth causeth
to being lulled entire throngs of Indian Bees, 17 does seduce me;
no longer mightest it be of my own fault that an atheist I am.
So, to I it seemeth, whom is that Ephebus, 18
of considering and the trumpeter of allusions vein;
that only by that negligible admonition which hath long-
sense, unto mine mother, escaped from memory
and from inundations grows whereof the Albino Star
does liveth with such a needfulness aside that novity
which is idle- idle always- and confideth I in simply a body which
is nascent and henceforth but a partial erudition of your laws:
does the pensive world judge me -
after which an Amazon I read
and did sing the news of Numa and Egeria 19
if I was another unto which the Italian goddess climbed
like Pausanias and the Xoanon 19 being thus discovered
for I have readeth yet those Protreptics of Iamblichus 20 yet
it is come to Eat the Brain 21, Ecce Signum, 22
I am like the root of Iberia 23 whence to try your navigations.
That when the Daughter of Heaven, 24 on that Sicilian Plan,
raiseth the Fig, 25 whence The Saturae of Ennius 26 infuseth our land,
hark that Enipeus 27 of the Peneios 28 couldest not allow
and neither would the Erembi 29 on who's shores mariners scowl.
Neither will this Earth avail, at last,
because it is to small; and too small for I
withal sixteen years did swallow Greece
and who is, before this canescent 30 Earth,
nothing but a fossil wandering; some exotic species
that the Earth couldest not yet release.
Time, being he whom is the most illiberal and
consecrated of the sons of Discrimination, saith
withal heart like Pallenia: 31 on these subjects which
seem to pleaseth mine ears with efficacious song
as in Planctus Cygni whereof for the Sun the Swan does long.
For if a man is but that which he knowest of or if
he is his philosophy, then it should be quite idoneous
to find that I knowest of a substance far more
ancient then the blood of men and thereof I am antiquated
as the river Inopus 32 that has a connexion with the Nile
to find the poet begging, unlike Theon the Scholar
for he was hence appointed to the Alexandrian Library last,
if all the world I could see was a world no higher then men
canst esteem like that medicine oft which Cardano of Pavia 33
enojyeth to making or hither could we dream of taking
as I know the final line of Ars magna which oft we are abating
with concerns the Heaven's writ I hath felt such need to making
that only once dost it be written thou canst expend the ancient.
I did sing for thee; Greece, Phoenecia, the Mount of Cyllene 34
and also an opulence of epithet which, in columns, hath thrived.
Knowing with certitude that my mind shouldest give
I stove with only a greater celerity towards that
which is arborescent, which is where my mind couldest end.
Ever still: I findeth difficulties in the absconding
from these knowledges as I do requireth of a greater element
then that of your prognostication and idealizing for,
as of yet, I've yet to sow in your name as many
worlds as Anaxarchus hath concieveth 35
nor have I produceth like the Corinthian 36 sort
that is feminine; which containeth your oscitant novity
and that you and civilization art synoecious 37
and that you succeedeth like Armenia; 38
and wherefore I couldest yet advise in the scholar nor
venerate like a poet: for you art like the vines of Jerusalem 39
and you shouldest be called that gem of history
who's Heaven couldest revealeth itself unto the philosopher
with those comforts of which only poetry couldest provideth;
and that detail wherewith these epithets and sciences renewest.
Whensoever the seal of Parturition 40 doth confide
in me that Cydonian 41 bough- of apples golden-
couldest I, some most inconsiderable one, infected by
those Pierides 42 whom is as Eson that collected dye- 43
presume diligently, with rectitude, in one contracted notion
which by my capital attests to those lines
which hitherto should follow:
Twas' right I, by the votaries 44, recline that I:
may sip sweet the ideas of their faith defined
which seemingly from the river of Lydian gold 45 do flow
and which like Etrurian 46 pinions seethe insouciant
like some Thebian princess 47 doth never letting go;
that I could raiseth mine kingdom in her midst
as those Argonauts whom to Colchis sailed 48
ever absenting mine Tyrrhenian house 49 in bliss
from whence some Temple of Thessaly 50 was detailed-
flying the river Euleus 51 which divideth the city Susiana from
Elymais 52 and, cultured from the Garden of Alcinous 53, I speaketh
Geoponica 54 as I should find my way as noble Cyrus did; 55
wouldest thou contracteth the Enneads 56 that I lived in peace
with Dietetical conservations, had my soul dance never cease;
hath I never disregard to take of Phaedrian lake 57 or by Piraeus 58 sail.
As it was that they 59 had set their eyes on that with
which they longed to kiss; as I must navigate that Emathian shore 60
from whence now only the shadow of that love I tell implores
inasmuch as auletic 61 songs, which of the Pierian cord, are licensed
with only those eclectic minds with value as the silk of Tyre 62
or it is like the avian thought which invigorates my night
causing me to towardeth it's Elitist tune climbing go:
and happens to provideth that most Cyllenian 63 invention
which causeth in my mind a beauty that is Ephestian 64 only;
for, inasmuch as I have knowledge over those spheres of
unusual word, and uncommon myth and name I riseth higher
yet then either Euphorion or Lycophron hath commiteth
as that is my own nature and the nature of my game
and I am now like that muse of Euboia myself
whom also commandeth the Nemian flute.
But ever- still, the luxury of poetry succeedeth in a women;
and leaves and words are always lesser then that.
As it was, whilst in my mother's midst,
with that Galatean doll from whence I made
a kingdom stalwart- and produced my rarified fluid
was I to reap the fortune that my Muse was payed
and henceforth acknowledge that which God infuses;
thereby inheriting those sovereignties of my own facade. AND
Twas' tamest wild, that Avian Cord: the Ichneumon's qualm (1)
when contained muse, by orient shell and inocciduous balm, (2)
hence had inclineth by it's thural Strain; Typhon and Ecnephia
whence above great Paropamisadae did I soar as Alexander
and withheld the Cataonian plain like twigs of cedar. (3, 3b)
As fragrant waters curdled rain hitherto becometh grander
that Syconia, which are the fruits of the Fig, perchance could live
longside those loaves and opsonium by which man was nourished
and which, like the Phoenician trade, doth requireth a league
so as to, in dehiscence, and in their own times be cultivated;
that in the forest it is this tree that provideth everlasting frutage.
070712
...
hgfykug "The Thetikomatheia" (thetikos{positive} amatheia{ignorance})

I submit this work in dedication to Sir Thomas Browne and that Greek poet, and also grammarian, Lycophron whom wrote as a show-piece for the School of Alexandria.

"I abhor all common things"- Callimachus

"The text no larger then the limbs of fleas;
And every square of text an awful charm,
Writ in a language that has long gone by.....but the long sleepless nights of
my long life have made it easy to me."- Idylls of the King.
---------------------------------------
Immodicus Diligo Iter itineris

Forgotten art all things which lovely lie: save what canst, with ease, thus find,
thou who dost inspireth e'en as the statue of Eutychides of Sicyon whence supplied
that incanous genius of my quiet breath, wheresoe'er thine every image is kept,
that oft-times hath charm'd allicient casements, thereof so opening, unto the mind
that thou mayst preventeth I from that misguided wont to needing live hitherward
as Erebus, who art every Poet's father by the way of Aether and Day;
that I calleth the penitence of stealing from thee to those amenities of my thoughts' place
in pathless and intemperate hope which lies that e'en God could stand in your lost haste
for that politic intrigue which canst filleth up both lament and praise- to such lonely dayes
a' far from Corydon and Thyrsis who wrote great eclogues by their homely glades.
O for I attended a youthful suit in those broken slaves, who whence calling themselves
Artists or Scientists, conceive thereof a scholar of the World's wayes- or e'en some
reverential Sui generis certified to honoreth, uponeth that altar of our Immortal Traits,
those judgments and candor wherewith God Almighty advocated his most tortured race:
that his natural image, in Man so thereof begotten, dost thereupon falter grace
the experient calculation unto which He entereth Beauty into Time and Place
that he canst removeth Man from those beatific movements of Life's natural state
unlike Eratosthenes of Cyrene who doth ascertaineth the Earth in it's actual length
for in the Soul's immurements of the Soul, which Philosophy we so dost calleth,
without the guide of love, there art a plenty of Men who abide by this laughable faith.
Forlorn! The foil of Our afflicted conceit canst not observe what Thou hath brought
in Heaven that is life's enthetic happiness which mine sound thought oft hath caught
to so readily visit in those newly garnered investures that twas, thereupon my hours,
oft given to that Epinician World that I dost calleth Hope and that thou blessedth- of
hitherto wanting thee over the writing of: O for thee who in the race of Thalestris hast
been hereof introduced unto I and from whence such charity firstly made descent
into Human Ambition that young Pindar, in thine own perficient motion, and vain sense,
thereof canst beset such solifidian Poems as these; that art so beauteous like Cleanthes
and his universal prayer which, to Zeus, was drawn.
AND so as to enliven my good heart
but also so as to, however so gradually, inciteth I
towards the continence of those good parts,
which oft born to thou dost I hark for I, delighted nigh,
as Apollonius of Tyana, in this ascetic hermitage,
hence recognize that for the Truth to thou I mayst embark.
Thou heard Wisdom in her choreutic and ecbolic tones
and captivated thy Soul shalt forever call that music Home.
And every time I fall in love I take a particle of her Beauty
with me, as Euryalus and Nisus, the ideal friends, doth fight,
to my own Soul that I canst become a genus of that love
untaught- that I canst become an Angel of the above unsought.
Prey tell, that I, the collector of names, should ask
thou ordained captain of my faith- thou inservient
messenger, what canst thou be called truly save the Parthenian day
like Pausanias at Syene wherefore the sun dost no shadow cast?
That thine grace doth I testeth like Eris' incentives in her apple passed
or e'en in that cautious will of God whence it dost so passey exerted
so doth to cause to climb the inimitable purpose that the Fates do lay
and thereof inaugurated in the one latreutic body on the Earth
doth the anxious contest of finding and treating what love thou gave
so pervade the teaching of a philosopher hence to leave wonder averted
that thine true Wisdom and Grace canst be revealed unto mine Birth
of the Poems hence that I surrendereth unto thine beauty as thine deserves.
What Capo Ducato thou canst provide, which from the Sea dost elect to rise,
that hath been here welcomed, in the dust converted,
those Dead Men thereof that all, in the policy of thine to keep,
the shining vision of your empaestic want, dost findeth triumph to ever sleep
so that in Our death to the World thou wilst the World keep.
Every key applied to the sky was crowned— of Stellae erraticae,
Pleiades, Hyads, the stars 1 which within The Soul art
crudely sound, that, standing unto, thou might riseth to
Pity the world for whilst our dayes have seen:
The sun, 2 when first by him the world was turned to die,
in it's inscient currency, and he hence treated us withal action sly
and of eyes that aspire to Heavens one couldest only dream-
but that one mayst write, or hope, or with grope, or of sing-
thee should maketh art the only thing compensatory known
which with thine contest dost leave to us to Our admonished Home
that entailsest thou dost knowest to pity that obtrusive spring
within our own lucent eyes that would Feed'st thine Soul
and poetry of vinous contempt and those services of lies
when should cometh the hallmark of that recursive beame,
hark, that to preventeth one's hopes of meeting wives it dreams.
That celebrity of Beings higher; 3 thou canst not tempt that
coming parhelic circle- 4 how in the still and shooting rayes,
of the Dietetical soul, loitering amidst the staid current of our sight
will thrive a deal of new earths, Orbes, and shooting rayes, of life:
which in manhood's strength will inundate to please thee -
Great sight 5, who had but thy inspiration given,
No matter through what danger sought I'll fathom hell
as Ćneas and that bough 6, e'en with it's veridical lentitude,
which now through all the general show of this Taste,
has brought your body up beneath your presuming face
which now around me layes like Enna or Umbilicus Sicilić 7:
or Proserpine's sacred grove that, as Cicero will point out,
was within a day's journey of the nearest point
on all of it's three coasts, like you, who's strange situation
leaves you yet commoner then most: and hence a landmark
amongst the penumbra of women like that queen Semiramis
who by doves was fed and oft thou bathe in thou vale
that is sororal and I in the variegated flesh of good hope.
Time, who art the expiscatory Lord of my Soul's thought,
how crude but curious thou doth grows't
and how truly brilliant it is when thee canst
unnerve the wide world and effused seasons
as thou whilst wander'st, to the back of me,
thou who causeth I to think myself some
luminary of the universe: for thou art the
caustic ether which surviveth Our cogent liqueur
that, in condign interest, whilst seem to
hang me in the fixtures of the most important
amongst the Napaeae which art whimsical.
Time, thou first created thing-
Time, preceding all, for it is in only you that
things art given precedence or newness-
you art the chief intoxicant, the strongest effect
is in your consumption of consumption itself.
The universe, being first inlaid with your drug,
leaves countless ages of insobriety for all things
under you are forced to take you and to you become addicted.
For you I, this glutton, be: to devour the tears
That fill’d the world's due, and by Time's disease,
Who's tender countenance, of him makest a legislator
of sorts, o' er which a government was made
which did roundeth nations out of thoughtful glades.
That is to linger in the thought of Poetical truth-
which curses Leo of Isauria 8 and the books of the Sun
of science 9, and aims to reveal the world's freshest ornament
and to eat the riper [8] should, whilst he bathe at sea,
thereby that only herald to the world's due-
and knowing withal modest kingship of thyself thy own,
to thine own vernation surrendereth thy sweet self too
Lest once more wandering from thee that I live- for it
is more than willingly that I livest for your gift: for more
than willingly I would neglect with my eyes, that wishing,
hath been fixed to staring upon an object to concise
that to be the object of my wish it would have done you so.
I, in my pelorian and syndetic state, out of well-tuned sounds,
by unions carried, do but sweetly chide thee, who confounds
In singleness the enatic stars- do I consider every thing that thou receiv'st
And, having climbed that true concord of your huge theater,
presenteth nought but an itinerant service in your effulgence of ignes fatui.
For what, if I die, would'st thou love me not even that what
hath I yet obtain, I could give: which should be termed desire;
and almost like the only sweets of our Earthly revenue.
To thy safe bosom I live, for more of the wandering
of my everlasting stress. I could once obtain, but I would give:
Which should sufficiently be full complete and nothing
wanting but the art of love- a sap checked with Eclipses of
my memory as it came to pass collected in your Septentrion.
After Death- that is the death of love- left nothing is,
and from the laic divide, shouldest the wise Inquireth
or come to figuring how to devise? When a spoil of books
shall besiege thy self alone, thou of her prime: thou mightest
get a sum of my old excuse proving your incidental expenses yet,
Attending on my own new-appearing sight and still
Serving with thy self dost thou spend upon thy time thy own
which is aureous to only you. She, I suppose, was such
another who found no substitute for emphasis; vacant of
celations, her Pacific bust gives promise of the skin's excellence.
But philosophy is known to draweth up the weak,
in her engraft, and in her art they lulled to sleep;
like those Bees who frometh Sephalica dost migrateth deep.
Search, into the social thought of, while thou wilst
of Reason, for that line which nature twists be known.
That thou art, to all the devils, inclined to learning in
this sum of nature's motions that I canst never die
and, reading them like the celestial shield of Nonnos 10,
or the veil that Josephus talked on 11 which with the
constellations of Heaven was decorated or even
that ovoid stone bearing an inscription for Sargon I
in dedication to the temple of Sippara 12, it would
come to passey that reflections unto you were sought
Till death abrupts them, and that instructive light,
Whose weary beams may on thy works to read,
That learning them in thee I shall havest my life.
I may on thy Maker's will; for unto reason go,
To ransom truth, e'en to read, that I might award
reason My great, sacred, oath: revealing Devils in
the sacred plan and professing in the the synectic smile,
thereby unto the Philosopher's rights that I would defile,
or that I shall drive, backed with the spoils of nature,
to stoop again below those Penates of the less divine 13,
Who's cernuous roses, for unto reason flow, to ransom
truth, e'en to replete the proof, of Love's sometimes being
but the grace which fascinates that to each other tie.
God, 'Then, by your favour, anything that's writ
Against this with unwonted thought as when homeward
I despise: this charity supernatural, with it's own
erotic tribe- whose talents lie in pride and vanities,
and when come to be enjoyed tear apart our World
whilst the wretched man or a churchman who thinks,
like sort, his actions in their fellow slaves to soar aloft,
Will call the hand of Arts to tame them in entertainment?
From my human heart, worthy of forgiveness,
With one impulse propels that bard
Who's famous with such authority,
Who's famous with eternity alone:
Not unlike Lel and Po-Lel 14 who, chasing each other,
do cause to being precipitated the aestival spirit.
Masters, I propose to be the mind, when sixty years
completed be, can from his shell, painting with a scholar
vain who is it for recompense, to behold a world that
already slumberest deep that I may succeedeth
to make my own circle of Vico 15 ; all for one hero
who but knew his own receipt and made a
lambent sunbeam in succinct lies he designed to tell
which would seek to illicit in his animal's life profiting
and causeth the world no longer to it's rest in peace.
I hate the bee whose sting is called enjoyment: [ie. orgasm]
Ah, happy, happy love! Thou art the most timid Silenus.
For ever bid the infinite movement of youth before my sight
where wasteful Time debateth there with only dicacity
and will, in benignant form, doth tease us out of each other's
woes so that love's familiar and intrinsical parts and all their
style I'll read and in His greatest power hide, stealing unseen
that I may outlive my love engrafted hence to this separation
with one I hath supposeth died; and there reigns Love,
and a ransom of all triumphant splendour unto thee-
so let him here who doth hence remain to see me
and calleth himself in the name of Reason's pride-
That Earth, Sea, and Air- supplied- should keepeth me
in this dapatical monument of the morning's eye alive!
EVEN as the shadow makes me first I burn, with
such true-love, in such a common one, In shape,
in sight: It is in you that I have come from this thrall,
hitherto in some remote corner of your tissues, all.
And for my sake, whilst thou lay on me alone,
Take all my sake to model races newer.
Thou shalt remaineth, in the midst of conticent nobility,
Eclectic and oscinian musician, unwearied in your exemplary labor,
as Numa Pompilius 16 who, in the name of Vesta,
constituted that temple thereof where the sacred fire burns
for I, myself, hath consigned to createth one of yours-
thereby that thou shalt commandeth, as Philopoemen's urn 17,
The threshold of Earth's beauty as the convict of your form:
A little town you are, shaped thereby heroic deities,
and of a Botany so splendidly wrought. But reason dost tease
us out of youth before this sight; and thou depriveth me of
partaking samples in a garden who's plants drawest breath
up in your only human passion which canst grant them life.
Our Earth mothered Man, and thee did mother Her;
Thou who couldest write the stars in numbers fresh for I.
Philosophy! My ineptitude of thinking shall not persuade me
that I, the blind, do clearly see of you who art but a thought
which in this breast of mine doth cover me: or at least my Soul,
that which in thee time's furrows, is so old.
In you man faced the problems of his life and climb, said then his rage,
His swift pursuer from Hope to immund Idols:
and hence name them Reason, Truth, and Scope
for Eternal Justice was layed vanquisht after these appear'd.
But philosophy herself, oer' which these pretensions fall,
is far more kind and the kindest still, of man's expenses all,
who is not the distant seraph rowling in Heaven that sat on
thrones which, oft reassembling our convincible Powers,
Consulted how the fervent Clime smote on the Nations round
For those that, being males, were caused to listen and to bound
and to sacrifice their eminence to this forlorn Patron of the proud;
who's method causes one to think himself, like a young Artist,
a member of some sacred Kind, though with more efficacious
and more intently present mind, for Philosophy, that masculine
practice, being named but only the pursuit of knowledge is
thereby apt to becoming a vehicle for poetic thought.
DESTINY WHO ART THOU, HUMAN LOVE'S OWN BODY,
THAT, INSPIRING ALL CONJUGATION, IS THE FINAL MUSE
That you are fair or wise and forever good;
That if one thing is vain
Or strong, or generous,
You must add those tyrants to your sword.
The sap of Art, procured in gentle work, dost stain
The lovely gaze where to me thou repliest,
Or rememberd where every eye was born
To make the fashions of perpetual sight my license:
Beauty is a nativity in You, O like Epimenides 19,
And to all your untaught strain- for Beauty is Success
and in success thou dost campaign- for ever will the
lovers new, by you, pronounce their independent Muse.
I would livest yet an Ecbatana 1 hence knowing where,
unto the Pinax of Cebe, 2 wouldest that epornitic issue of
Thales 3 collect to supporteth mine soul to traveling and
treasure like from the way my pen couldest move to thee
so in that natation of the Heavens couldest I yet ever leave
that can be lived by I within them such nescient worlds.
AND into which the Enneads of Plotinus, 4 as it were
that they shouldest about one groweth, were like pale angels
which in imitativeness doth try to explain the way you work;
who art a mother to me like The Suidas 5 or the
Theatrum of Ortelius 6 or even those lands of
Sidon, 7 into which Jesus and Herod 8 passeyd,
or the Origines of Cato 9 which of the cities of Italy
would tell or even shouldest you be
like that Tower of Persia, 10 mentioned in the works of
Procopius of Caesarea, wherein one was buried live.
What of God's design which is deictic 11 that, in supinity,
should have it that those measures of your youth
should causeth me, in mine, a learner of Palaemon? 12
The erroneousness of the part that is my greatest calls; that
in God's edict I had only, by the face incanous, 13
came so as to chance unto contention that surviveth without name.
I saith; that if God, of want, should uniteth the
Men of Earth unto his Heaven then why art those men so
disposed towards these feelings which, unaccompanied,
do so readily evoke a feeling of divine consummation?
For when merely the thought of you, which is like the
Statua of Janus, 14 causes to issue Salmacis 15
and, like that redolence of Nilica, 16 which doth causeth
to being lulled entire throngs of Indian Bees, 17 does seduce me;
no longer mightest it be of my own fault that an atheist I am.
So, to I it seemeth, whom is that Ephebus, 18
of considering and the trumpeter of allusions vein;
that only by that negligible admonition which hath long-
sense, unto mine mother, escaped from memory
and from inundations grows whereof the Albino Star
does liveth with such a needfulness aside that novity
which is idle- idle always- and confideth I in simply a body which
is nascent and henceforth but a partial erudition of your laws:
does the pensive world judge me -
after which an Amazon I read
and did sing the news of Numa and Egeria 19
if I was another unto which the Italian goddess climbed
like Pausanias and the Xoanon 19 being thus discovered
for I have readeth yet those Protreptics of Iamblichus 20 yet
it is come to Eat the Brain 21, Ecce Signum, 22
I am like the root of Iberia 23 whence to try your navigations.
That when the Daughter of Heaven, 24 on that Sicilian Plan,
raiseth the Fig, 25 whence The Saturae of Ennius 26 infuseth our land,
hark that Enipeus 27 of the Peneios 28 couldest not allow
and neither would the Erembi 29 on who's shores mariners scowl.
Neither will this Earth avail, at last,
because it is to small; and too small for I
withal sixteen years did swallow Greece
and who is, before this canescent 30 Earth,
nothing but a fossil wandering; some exotic species
that the Earth couldest not yet release.
Time, being he whom is the most illiberal and
consecrated of the sons of Discrimination, saith
withal heart like Pallenia: 31 on these subjects which
seem to pleaseth mine ears with efficacious song
as in Planctus Cygni whereof for the Sun the Swan does long.
For if a man is but that which he knowest of or if
he is his philosophy, then it should be quite idoneous
to find that I knowest of a substance far more
ancient then the blood of men and thereof I am antiquated
as the river Inopus 32 that has a connexion with the Nile
to find the poet begging, unlike Theon the Scholar,
for he was hence appointed to the Alexandrian Library last,
if all the world I could see was a world no higher then men
canst dream. In that line oft which Cardano of Pavia 33
enojyeth to making I find myself of wont to herein imitating
as I know the final line of Ars magna which oft we are abating
with concerns this Heaven's writ I hath felt such need to making
that only once dost it be written that thou canst defend the ancients.
I did sing for thee; Greece, Phoenecia, the Mount of Cyllene 34
and also an opulence of epithet which, in columns, hath thrived.
Knowing with certitude that my mind shouldest give
I stove with only a greater celerity towards that
which is arborescent, which is where my mind couldest end.
Ever still: I findeth difficulties in the absconding
from these knowledges as I do requireth of a greater element
then that of your prognostication and idealizing for,
as of yet, I've yet to sow in your name as many
worlds as Anaxarchus hath concieveth 35
nor have I produceth like the Corinthian 36 sort
that is feminine; which containeth your oscitant novity
and that you and civilization art synoecious 37
and that you succeedeth like Armenia; 38
and wherefore I couldest yet advise in the scholar nor
venerate like a poet: for you art like the vines of Jerusalem 39
and you shouldest be called that gem of history
who's Heaven couldest revealeth itself unto the philosopher
with those comforts of which only poetry couldest provideth;
and that detail wherewith these epithets and sciences renewest.
Whensoever the seal of Parturition 40 doth confide
in me that Cydonian 41 bough- of apples golden-
couldest I, some most inconsiderable one, infected by
those Pierides 42 whom is as Eson that collected dye- 43
presume diligently, with rectitude, in one contracted notion
which by my capital attests to those lines
which hitherto should follow:
Twas' right I, by the votaries 44, recline that I:
may sip sweet the ideas of their faith defined
which seemingly from the river of Lydian gold 45 do flow
and which like Etrurian 46 pinions seethe insouciant
like some Thebian princess 47 doth never letting go;
that I could raiseth mine kingdom in her midst
as those Argonauts whom to Colchis sailed 48
ever absenting mine Tyrrhenian house 49 in bliss
from whence some Temple of Thessaly 50 was detailed-
flying the river Euleus 51 which divideth the city Susiana from
Elymais 52 and, cultured from the Garden of Alcinous 53, I speaketh
Geoponica 54 as I should find my way as noble Cyrus did; 55
wouldest thou contracteth the Enneads 56 that I lived in peace
with Dietetical conservations, had my soul dance never cease;
hath I never disregard to take of Phaedrian lake 57 or by Piraeus 58 sail.
As it was that they 59 had set their eyes on that with
which they longed to kiss; as I must navigate that Emathian shore 60
from whence now only the shadow of that love I tell implores
inasmuch as auletic 61 songs, which of the Pierian cord, are licensed
with only those eclectic minds with value as the silk of Tyre 62
or it is like the avian thought which invigorates my night
causing me to towardeth it's Elitist tune climbing go:
and happens to provideth that most Cyllenian 63 invention
which causeth in my mind a beauty that is Ephestian 64 only;
for, inasmuch as I have knowledge over those spheres of
unusual word, and uncommon myth and name I riseth higher
yet then either Euphorion or Lycophron hath commiteth
as that is my own nature and the nature of my game
and I am now like that muse of Euboia myself
whom also commandeth the Nemian flute.
But ever- still, the luxury of poetry succeedeth in a women;
and leaves and words are always lesser then that.
As it was, whilst in my mother's midst,
with that Galatean doll from whence I made
a kingdom stalwart- and produced my rarified fluid
was I to reap the fortune that my Muse was payed
by henceforth acknowledging that which God infuseth;
thereby inheriting those sovereignties of my own facade. AND
Twas' tamest wild, by that Avian Cord, and the Ichneumon's qualm, (1)
when muse contained, by orient shell and inocciduous balm, (2)
hence had inclineth by it's thural Strain; Typhon and Ecnephia
whence above great Paropamisadae did I soar as Alexander
and withheld the Cataonian plain like twigs of cedar. (3, 3b)
As fragrant waters curdled rain, hitherto becometh grander,
that Syconia, which are the fruits of the Fig, perchance could live
longside those loaves and opsonium by which man was nourished
and which, like the Phoenician trade, doth requireth a league
so as to, in dehiscence, and in their own times be cultivated;
that in the forest it is this tree that provideth everlasting frutage.

So that artesian is the sense, the organ of the Earth in you,
- whence moved to swell (4)
as Chloris by the vernal and vestal endearment of gale or that (5)
frail allodium pith which enriched Lampetia's Spire:(6)
to that Cyllenian and inermis Angel's firmament (7) (7b)
by the illecebrous fire; such a thing conceding a most prevalent sheen.
To hyaline brain, to that Dulcarnon Jail- faithfully burning.(8)
Watching familiarly as dim Alpheus in needing Artemis. (9)
BY obstinate pulses, being chained about a long vernal haul-
Long vernal pull, long vernal withdrawal;
Through that Farina meal devout parallel crawl. We, content Sisyphus;
We are as sussurant and calm, concerning with
articles of but the grasses, hills, trees, fruits, and bogs;
Pondering balsamical immanency, to release youth prolonged.
"Écorcheurs"-looted, depleted of vogue-fashion and (10)
of that Lerna of our pains; regarding that mendacity (11)
betwixt all, by the admission of larceny no; the incantations
have been rationed or pawned, with regards for my commuting
for Phaedria lake, from which I absconded wanton: (12)
orderly, to perform a crawling along some assortment
of niveous diadems, as Haemos proves strong(13)-
that boreal throng. Respond to me!
Petrels, Fulmars, Shearwaters; procellarian magnate! (14)
It is that bird, who's musing and coalescent pinions
and him performing that assortment of caprioles above
the open seas improves! I may never reach his heavens but,
in some fashion, I have been infected by their stupendous frame.
And the Earth might forever excuse herself from laying with me;
But with her I am, and doth forever gracefully Be.
In such a philosophy, as had I wrote: was called into symmetry-
some fumbling bloke. In such a philosophy, as had I made-
Was burning, that Muse- but in poetry she doth no longer (In
commitments of trade) permit me finer hours.
Hitherto Man advanced whom surrendereth not to the Aves
as it was that Lycoris hath outgrown the Ecnephia office
and the Eternal column hath been undone
that the Idaean ideals thereof were seated
by viatical musings, whereof by the air Symposium hung
and through all of those worlds twas' philosophy depleted.
I am the dog who, when his master dies, slowly does disintegrate by his grave.
070719
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