beethoven
typhoid beethoven
and sencha
and black bean soup
trying to get my mind back on line.
reading the egyptian book of the dead.
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unhinged the father of romance and everything i have ever loved

he likes to dance to the emperor concerto. marvel at it's sheer virtousity. maybe someday she could play it for you.
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mikey i love classical music. my favourite though is Bach. 010315
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jem little note:
bach was baroque
beethoven was classical... early romantic
my favourite composers are bizet (he played the flute, and wrote some beautiful flute solos) and berlioz (my favourite of his being symphonie fantasique, 5th mvmt)
both were romantic composers... romantic meaning emotional, not frilly
just thought i'd share my vast knowledge of music...
=curtsies=
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unhinged most composers of the romantic era spent their careers in the shadow of beethoven. he's considered by many historians to be the first romantic composter especially stuff he wrote in his third period. brahms, schumann, and schubert where just a few guys that had trouble in the lingering shadow of beethoven. and berlioz's symphonie fantastique is a direct model of beethoven's programmatic sixth symphony. he even directly borrowed some of beethoven's themes of sheperds and storms in the symphonie fantastique. berlioz wrote for the violin like it was a flute. i don't care for him much. marche au supplice is great though. 010315
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Aimee I worship the musical trinity, Bach the Father, Beethoven the Son and Brahms the Holy Spirit. 010315
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monadh makes my heart pulse
sets my emotions
astir
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unhinged when beethoven realized his deafness was a permanent affliction he almost killed himself. i'm so glad that he didn't. string quartet op. 131 is great. 010316
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lost too bad he didnt kill himself. I used to think classical music want bad. that was befor i realized that music should be loud hard and (sic) 010316
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unhinged it got there eventually...have you ever listend to mahler by chance?

there wouldnt be any hard loud type stuff without beethoven buddy.
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jem true...
beethoven was like the metallica of the classical era
started a whole new breed of music... was liked and fear by different people
similes are fun
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unhinged i just can't stand it all the 'classical' talk going on here these days...being that i just got my brain back into academic/dissecting/music school bullshit/analysis mode for school again i keep thinking about all these connections anyways. haydn ---- beethoven ----- brahms

yeah it's like some kind of flow chart, some pyramid, with the basest of haydn at the bottom just like all those base builders back in egypt (i have just read a significant amount of oldephebe's stuff and his style is somewhat permeating my brain right now). while haydn didn't exactly create the genre of the symphony he adapted it to the path of greatness that it would later take in the hands of beethoven and brahms. and there is no doubt that haydn was the father of modern instrumentation; the father of the string quartet as foundation of anything whether it was just the string quartet or the symphony. although maybe he wasn't the one to establish the string family as the basis of symphonic instrumentation...but yeah whatever. i just couldn't see someone dis haydn. but i guess it was ingrained in me the importance of family history. those good ole germans...they all would not have existed in their genius without the ones before. maybe beethoven was the great rebel, but he rebelled (and conformed) to the style that haydn made for him. without haydn comes no beethoven, without beethoven comes no brahms. and having played quartets of both haydn and beethoven haydn had some sheer strokes of genius himself. and that and he was damn funny at times. weird, bizarre, kind of a rebel in his own right. and that's probably why the three of them stand out to us all now a few hundred years later. cause they were changing what was around to create new epochs in history. and i think the only way to test the true genius of a composer is in his chamber music; because that is where you will find the most intimate music. while the symphonies of haydn, beethoven, brahms, shostakovich, yeah they're all great, it's the chamber music that gets to the heart of them all. it's the chamber music that makes everything inside me turn inside out. and it's just the sheer intimacy of sitting down with three or so other people with no one to guide you but the beating in your own hearts; yeah i'm definitely a kartman cult convert.

and once again, i am going to stop myself. enough of my 'long-winded talking down about all things musical'
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oldephebe that was comprehensive and beautiful - unhinged -

not a word I can add - it would seem superfluous - nicely done

later,

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oldephebe unhinged - i just listened to beethovens "il Largo" (sp?)by the Eroica trio..the leads bowing was so mellifluous so equissitely melancholy i found my self on the edge of tears during so of the more expressive, extended passages. I will definately hitting the record store in the enarest mall..although i do so loath partcipating in that perambulating, masticating consumptive slack-jawed procession..still though it would be worth the momentatry distaste to get ahold of Eroica Trio's newest CD. I'm sorry I know i sound a little elitist, unfortunately when i studies opera and voice and what not in the neolithic age, there was a pronounced edge of elitism to our profesors inculcation and some of it has rubbed off..but wait.. i was making more of a social commentary on the phenomena of malldom right? It wasn't really connected or derivative of classical music elitism. casual misanthopy masquerading as an efette elitism... yeah a psychoanalyst would make a mint offah me. Big couch and thorazine derivative stupor here i come..still though beethoven never ever ceases to fill me with awe.. 031124
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oldephebe when i studies opera? i sound like a bufoon in black face from vaudeville or something!!! okay when i studied opera, voice..i've just burlesqued this pretentious discussion of the maestro..

*scurries off to a dark corner, head bowed*
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oldephebe unhinged - i just listened to beethovens "il Largo" (sp?)by the Eroica trio..the leads bowing was so mellifluous so equisitely melancholy, i found myself on the edge of tears during some of the more expressive, extended passages. I will definately be hitting the record store in the nearest mall..although i do so loath partcipating in that perambulating, masticating consumptive slack-jawed procession..still though it would be worth the momentary distaste to get a hold of The Eroica Trio's newest CD. I'm sorry. I know i sound a little elitist, unfortunately when i studied opera and voice and what not in the neolithic age, there was a pronounced edge of elitism to our profesors inculcation and some of it has rubbed off..but wait.. i was making more of a social commentary on the phenomena of malldom right? It wasn't really connected or derivative of classical music elitism. casual misanthopy masquerading as an efette elitism... yeah a psychoanalyst would make a mint off of me. Big couch and thorazine derivative stupor here i come..still though beethoven never ever ceases to fill me with awe.. 031124
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unhinged i'm writing a paper on brahms write now and i did a half-assed in-depth analysis of the first violin sonata and i see now even more how he is indebted to beethoven. tried his damnedest to get out of beethoven's shadow but brahms was his long lost musical son. the sonata form of the first movement is so germinal and beethoven-like that it's kinda scary. definitely brahms, but definitely brahms learning from beethoven.

i'm telling you pheb...the second movement of the op. 132 string quartet....talk about tear-inducing beauty. and there it is in all it's glory. and i was fortunate enough to hear it live TWICE. *shudder*

it's always hard for me to cry in public. i guess the allure of brahms and beethoven is that is was not idle passion or misdirected want. to this day nothing creates better music than hardship. in my opinion. :-)
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oldephebe yep..very well put 031124
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helly like tchaikovski
amazing
deaf and gorgeous
mmm
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andru235 what i wouldn't do for thirty two more piano sonatas from the guy...

supposedly he had begun, in his final year, an e-flat major symphony (#10). oh, sure, you big jerk, teasing us with divine gifts we cannot have.

it was said by someone or other, of the Hammerklavier Fugue (last movement of piano sonata #29) that "the world doesn't deserve that fugue". i can play the finale right up until the beginning of the fugue, and then i can cry, cry away, for the fugue is too difficult for me.

i have vowed to save symphony #4 (incidentally, i accidentally heard most of it once on the radio i think) and the last five string quartets until i feel i am at the end of my days; i was also going to save a bruckner symphony, oh well.

he_knew_more_than_you_think he did; there are some...curiousities...hidden within his 'writing'...☺☻☺
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unhinged i want to learn the concerto. i'm not quite ready for it technically, but i think it will push me to be better.


i've been out of school long enough, i'm actually starting to miss hearing this music, let alone playing it.


it was beethoven day in form and analysis. it was the only motivating factor for me to go to class that day. dr. largent stood against the media cart shaking his head at as as we came in and sat down. at one o clock , he started class with 'it's beethoven. let's listen.' not his usually long-winded historical background speech and put on the second movement of the seventh symphony. i remember that piece of music bowling me over in that room with that old stereo and it was everything i had not to start bawling. dr. largent always found the best recordings for us. the room was so charged up when it was over, that he surprised all of us and whispered 'let's listen to that again.' i think that was probably one of the most profound classes of my college career. he raced through the analysis with us and played it for us, i think like two more times before class was over. he was usually a man that had no problem lecturing for fifty minutes, but instead he just let us listen to it in that funky ass bathtub recital hall for the better part of the class. because everytime we listened to it, you could hear one more part of it that added one more layer to the story that was playing in your head.

*sigh* a good beethoven symphony movement does it for me everytime.
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unhinged .


i keep meaning to walk to the music store to buy the sheet music for the concerto but now my damn bow needs rehaired

*sigh*
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