cognitive
silentbob cognitive

Cog"ni*tive, a. Knowing, or apprehending by the understanding; as, cognitive power. --South.
Source: Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary, 1996, 1998 MICRA, Inc.
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birdmad ...dissonance 020419
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not god distance 041010
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monee i have cognitive problems 041228
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monee cognitive_and_emotional 041228
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monee i try to work around/with them


for instance, spelling my name mon as nom
happenened for whatever reason that i spelled it backwords, but then thought it was cool 'cause backwords are kinda cool. i just generally like the way things look when they're backwards and upside down.

so, sometimes it can be fun to have a problem like that, i don't mind it so much.

other problems are not so fun,...i didn't use cash for years because i can get confused counting money. trying to sell tickets at a festival one year was really hard for me. i cried at one point.


i have a hard time following directions. (did they say left or right, right or left, shit shit shit, i'm going the wrong way)


it all hits me the most when i'm stressed.
041228
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monee "...Many CFIDS patients have compared their cognitive difficulties to being "in a fog". In many ways, the CFIDS brain is functioning as though it is asleep, even though the patient is awake. Careful evaluation of data taken from hundreds of CFIDS patients showed patients had abnormal increases in slow wave activity compared to healthy controls and patients with other diseases. Essentially CFIDS patients are utilizing non-functional waveforms such as Delta and Theta to do functional tasks in a compensatory way. This slow wave activity is consistent with a metabolic encephalopathy (brain injury).

Research has shown that the brain activity of the CFIDS patient speeds up when the eyes are closed and it slows down when the eyes are open, which is the opposite of a normal response. This may be one reason that conventional EEG results for CFIDS patient are often evaluated as "normal", since they are typically done in an eyes-closed position. CFIDS patients display unique functional brain abnormalities only when you compare the data of patients/controls while being cognitively challenged with the eyes open..."
- from:
http://www.siberimaging.com/services.asp?id=5

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041228
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monee "...Many people with CFIDS experience brain fog the sensation of being lost in a waking trance, hearing but not comprehending, talking but not making sense....In neurotherapy, the goal is to change brain wave patterns. The brain has four main states of alertness, each corresponding to a brain wave. High-frequency beta waves are present during active, waking moments, while alpha waves are associated with daydreaming or reflective states. Low-frequency theta and delta waves are usually present during rest or sleep.

People with CFIDS (PWCs) often show markedly different patterns than normal, Preston says. Preston has discovered that people with CFIDS produce predominantly slow-wave activity. While most people show beta (fast) wave activity when performing cognitive tasks, CFIDS patients try to perform them with theta and delta states instead.

Their intelligence remains intact, but the ability to access it is unpredictable and unreliable. The brain reverses the order in which it is supposed to perform; when the eyes are open, the brain slows down, and when they are closed, the brain speeds up.

Its like trying to work when your brain says sleep, Preston says. Its no wonder that people have so many disabling symptoms and trouble concentrating.

The brain wave patterns of PWCs resemble those of people with closed head injuries and hepatic encephalophathy. Preston says the predominance of slow-wave activity can be correlated with symptoms such as sleep disturbance, short-term memory problems, low blood pressure, reduced energy, cognitive difficulties, headaches, nausea, heart arrhythmias and more..."

from:
http://www.cfids.org/archives/2003/2003-1-article07.asp

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monee living_in_dreams
awake_and_dreaming
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monee malfunction_at_the_junction 041228
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mon uow it's not so bad now as it was before, i can still get quite confused, but overall i think my brain is improving


other than problems with remembering some of the details of certain traumatic childhood experiences, i used to have an excellent memory,...had a childhood iq high enough to be labelled 'highly gifted', which doesn't say much i guess but, it was frustrating for me going from having a 'great' memory to um what was i talking about again?
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