my_favorite_painting
werewolf that gustav klimt sure knew how to say something about a kiss. 021005
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curious toys edward hopper....
reminds you what it is to be alone...
the awkward stillness of midafternoons...
the loneliness of endless nights...
isolation, alienation portrayed in perfect light.
"nighthawks"
"hotel room"
"new york movie"
021005
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Photophobe Paul Klee "The Twittering MAchine" 021006
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screwing for virginity its not really a painting, but...

in some original mother goose and grimm book there is this picture of this tree that came to life (treant) and is hugging this girl.

damn, i wish i knew the name of the picture, or even the story it came from.
021006
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Ingigo Pixie "Starry Night" By Van Gogh 021007
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Indigo Pixie "Starry Night" By Van Gogh 021007
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lobsterman put your faith_in_a_starry_night 021007
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.nom i don't know yet 050218
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oldephebe well the one that comes to mind is this work by a 16th century dutch guy. De Veers or something? He captures this 16 year old farm girl pouring milk out of grecian urn or something..the clarity (for that age or any age)is astonishing. I mean he captures something tragic and hopeful and fallen and hidden in the girls eyes
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050218
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Piso Mojado oe-
Johannes Vermeer, 'The Milkmaid' c1660
050218
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a thimble in time Vermeer captures the sound of milk
pouring
into a jar
050218
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Mister Brightside Hieronymous Bosch "garden of eartly delights"

it's the wallpaper on the rooms that exist inside my head

alive, moving and every bit as twisted and noisy as it seems
050218
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() today (and often) it is joan of arc 1879 by jules bastien lepage. it hangs at the met in nyc. i have loved it since i was 17. it seems to inhabit the crossroads between classical, renaissance, romantic and impressionistic painting. there is an almost fauvist quality to the big brush style used in the garden. the angels are quite impressionistic as is the dappled light that filters through the trees overhead but does not fall on joan. joan and her clothing are painted in a realist style that reminds me of the dutch enlightenment painters but her face is a festival of glazing techniques more at home in a work from the renaissance. the realism and humanity indicated in the gesture of her toes where they peak out from under the robe and clutch the earth is quite visceral. i believe that anyone who has stood barefoot on moist earth can recognize the mastery of representation exhibited there.

i have resisted the urge to attempt to parse the symbolic content of the work. it stands on it's own as a record of the artist's experience (both of it's making and as evidence of his personal sensorium).

i love this work. a i stand before it quietly for as long as i am able. it is quite large and can be viewed with nothing else in my visual field. it is a universe.
050219
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z http://www.art-liquidation.com/jules_bastien_lepage.htm

(the color is very compromised here)
050219
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oE Thank you Piso

wow there's some really great exposition and analysis here
050219
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phil climbingthehill (phobia)
by uow.
050219
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phil there's a few, but since this one is related to blather and probably number 3 of my actual favorites. It wins. 050219
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whitechocolatewalrus is in_your_eyes 050219
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mon uow phil,...? seriously? 050220
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mon uow i want to say wow. 050220
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mon uow it's yours if you like it. 050220
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ever dumbening: verdictum anon i'll make my vote after the end of my week in manhattan.

but i think there's a parallel between live_jazz and seeing the actual paintings (and sculptures etc). art it not meant to be seen in photos or on tv, unless it is photos or tv. and speaking of tv ... this you must do: go to the whitney, see bill viola's video installation entitled 'five angels for the millenium'. it is AMAZING.
050220
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phil get ahold of me uow
dreamotters2003@yahoo.com
050307
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jane what an interesting collection this makes. i just looked them all up & now am juxtaposing them with the delight of an art history major 050307
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jane right now its anthony van dyck's self portrait. not the one where he's doing his i'm_a_little_teapot pose, the other, harder to find one. here, i found it for you.

http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/hd/rvd_p/hob_49.7.25.htm
050307
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Piso Mojado why that one, jane? 050307
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z (good resource j. thanks.)

http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/hd/sara/ho_89.21.1.htm
050307
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jane well, self portraits have always fascinated me anyway; i suppose the idea of how people see themselves. and i dont know if i can tell you why i'm so attracted to this painting. i've seen the real one in the met, and i wrote a short paper on it, where i said:
"As I wandered around a bit more, Anthony van Dyckís eyes caught mine and pulled me in. These eyes belonged to his self portrait, painted around 1620-21. The painting was larger than the one I had been looking at previous; it was 47 1/8 x 34 5/8 inches. I continued to stare into the eyes of Anthony van Dyck. He stared back. He looked at me with concern.
Van Dyck was a talented young artist who worked in Rubensí studio before 1620. Looking at his self portrait, I can see some of the same values attributed in Rubensí portraits. The placard says, ďHe portrays himself here as a somewhat foppish gentleman, avoiding all reference to his profession as a painter. Two self-portraits related to the present painting, as well as an oil sketch of the artistís head, all showing van Dyck at the age of about twenty, suggest the youthful artistís self-conscious awareness of his genius
And how. I stared into his eyes for I donít know how long, before I realized I should also be observing the other delicate decisions he made for the depiction of himself. First, I noticed that he painted himself at a slight angle from below, enhancing his stature. Next I made a small sketch of the colors and lines he used.
The most prominent straight line in the painting is the line of the ledge on which he rests his arm. This line cuts the painting in half right through the middle. I wondered why he had cut himself in half, and I think perhaps he was trying to depict his duality. It seems to me he was content being a painter but in another sense he was always somewhat longing for something. This feeling was affirmed by the look in his eyes. The other prominent line in the painting is the edge of the column behind him. This line serves as a perpendicular connection to the main horizontal line, and consequently brings more attention to his face. I can see the influence of Rubens in the circle beginning at the focus point, the face, brought around by the sweeping of van Dyckís cloak and his bent right arm.
The colors in the painting seem somewhat dull at first, mainly brown and dark blue with the exception of his skin. However, attention is drawn to his vaguely parted lips, the color lips turn after eating a cherry or orange Popsicle. It is appealing; I wanted to kiss those lips. The colors also seem symbolic in a sense: because the background is divided into light brown and dark blue, I saw more of van Dyckís dual nature, the dark introspective side he didnít usually reveal to people.
This idea is confirmed, as van Dyck has hidden that darker half behind the black cloak. The other half is dressed normally for the time, with an off-white undershirt and a dark red coat. This, I suspected, is the side most people saw, the passionate artist side. Even his facial expression can be analyzed in halves. The left side is determined, and his eyebrow suggests a sort of optimism. When I looked only at the right side of his face, he seemed sad and incisive.
I turned my attention to the position in which he placed his hands. In both hands I could see the same kind of technique Rubens used on Susannaís right hand, that flowing, emotive gesture. The left hand flows down with ease, correlating with the ease he shows in presenting that lighter, passionate side of himself. The right hand has to reach up to touch lightly the edge of the counter, which represents a sort of difficulty in connecting the darker side with that lighter side. His hair even has the same kind of division: easily swept to the right and carefully left down."

sorry, thats pretty long. to sum it up, i want to kiss his lips. and his hair looks soft.
050307
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unhinged van_gogh


pretty much anything van_gogh
his self portraits make me want to cry

gregory_gillespie
i met him once
his portraits look like he trapped the person's soul
stuck on a wooden canvas
with no way out
050308
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stork daddy Francis Bacon's Three Studies for Figures at the Base of a Crucifixion 050308
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psa The Lady of Shallot. Any one of them. 050308
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Piso Mojado jane you old art historian you,
thank you for that description
050403
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Piso Mojado Edward Munch- Madonna

"...And here is the anguish of the feminine. Her veiled lids suggest inner rememberings and inner imaginings, as does her rounded belly. Does she this moment feel herself transformed-forever transformed, transformed by the new consciousness that will take shape within her and come forth in the fullness of time? Can she bear the fruit?"

"And if we turn the picture upside down, the eyes look into ours with unspeakable wisdom, unspeakable beauty, unspeakable horror. We feel we have lifted a veil we ought not to have touched, and turn the picture right side up. But infinity still rolls through us because the truth that is in our cells is in her cells. They resonate true, too true.

This is a paradoxical Madonna, much more an expression of soul because she is so utterly grounded. This body carries the Black Madonna's energy. It is not concretized matter, body without feeling. In her, metaphor lives, energy transforms. Soul is in every cell, beauty in its naked essence."

Dancing in the Flames- The Dark Goddess in the Transformation of Consciousness
by Marion Woodman and Elinor Dickson
050403
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pSyche Magic Circle by Waterhouse 050613
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a chaotic gift to idealism some of my favorite paintings. morbid and cartooney. *kisses fingertips* wonderful!
http://www.wondertoonel.com/paintings/index.html#

i believe one of my favorites would be "The Cloven Bunny" at the bottom right.
http://www.markryden.com/images/paintings/blood/paintings/clovenbunny/detail.jpg
as well as...
http://www.markryden.com/images/paintings/blood/paintings/rose/detail.jpg


http://www.beksinski.pl/glowna.swf
this is one of my favorite websites. i envy those who have the patience for flash webwork. i only do html xhtml xml phpnuke. the music is just beautiful, so drastic and calming. something to jerk tears from my face.

one of my favorites from him would be "1972" found in the limited edition drawings... top image.

If you enjoy the music you can find the composer at http://www.preisner.com/
no, i am not advertising for anyone specifically... just sharing what i find to be one of my very few joys.
050614
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Deathofarose After the Bath by Edgar Degas 050614
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Lemon_Soda Tom Hallman's cover for "Curtain of Three" by Rex Stout. 050614
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Friendly Title Checker "Curtains For Three" 050614
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Lemon_Soda Right. Sorry. Thanks. 050614
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unhinged van_gogh


pretty much anything van_gogh
his self portraits make me want to cry

"gregory_gillespie
i met him once
his portraits look like he trapped the person's soul
stuck on a wooden canvas
with no way out "
...

adroitly captured unhinged
050615
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jane mine. the one of kari. 081008
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hsg I suppose a smooth blend of alex_grey & dali. nah, fuck that. what i'm looking at right now. description: a flowering, blooming, kaleidoscoping matrix. cubes, two_way_mirrored out in each of the six (and of course a world inside the inner seventh).

holy_shit ! never thought i'd see tealquoise.. thISome shady shit.
081009
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hsg *each of the 6 directions 081009
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three words silent_treatment voted my_favorite_painting 101225
what's it to you?
who go
blather
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